Sandy & Harry

Spanning nearly a decade, the Sandy and Harry letters are a treasure of post-War romance.

First we see Sandy as the nervous English War Bride of American G.I. Harry. Then we are afforded an intimate look into her first return visit nearly a decade later to England, with her and Harry's daughters -- during which England celebrates the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.

 

All captured in first person, vivid details of time and place in history are on display in these fantstic letters. 

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February 2 1945
October 13 1945
"And next – about your being Jewish– I don’t care what you are darling– and I’m ready to change my religion for you at any time – and any kids would be brought up the same– that’s if you want me!! As for me marrying an English Boy– that’s definitely out– my husband has to be Living! So being frank, it’s you or no-one."

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January 11 1946
"Did you hang up your xmas stocking? I did, and to my disgust I found a teething ring in it next day– just because I’m having trouble with wisdom teeth! The cads!! What a time I had– on waking up, as usual I dashed across to the mirror, and had one heck of a shock– taking advantage of my being a heavy sleeper– the family had blacked my face with soot– with many etceteras–what a crowd they are!! "

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February 25 1946
January 30 1946
"I don’t know how things are over your side of the “pond”– but this side is blooming awful- there’s the biggest epidemic of ‘flu that I can remember right now I’m home nursing mom with it and believe me she’s awful sick– its just impossible to get a nurse– and still more impossible to get any laundry done– so I’ve done the next best thing– did the laundry myself–boy what a job too!!"

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May 9 1946
"What do you think of the snaps? My friend took them when we went to the the Isle-of-Wight for the weekend. We went to the Alum Bay– actually its the farthest point of the island– the needles are right by where we we’re sitting. The girls wanted to take a snap of me falling over the cliff edge–but I was a meanie and wouldn’t let them– the rats!!"

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June 4 1946
"This afternoon– we leave for London– we’re going to see the Victory Parade you know– I’ll write and tell you all about it. Four of the girls from the office came to tea yesterday so I took them & showed them my now full wardrobe– ha! You should have seen their faces– unfortunately my clothes do not fit them."

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June 6 1946
"As soon as I do “get my ride” over there, dear you can really bank on all the help you need from me – and that I mean!!…I bet I’ll be a buyer of an opening– especially as there will be nylons nocking around!! Better watch out you don’t get lynched…or something!!….Incidentally, the car sounds absolutely superb– don’t forget to send me a picture of it..."


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September 4 1946
"Firstly we had to parade in front of judges and the audience– the judges awarded their points and picked three of us– then the audience had to clap for the one they thought should win– & was I scared??!! It’s been terrible since though– people asking all sorts of questions, and wanting to know all the inns and outs of my business. "

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September 15 1946
"Darling– once again– I definitely have not changed my mind, don’t you see, that not hearing from you for so long, made me think that maybe something was up– anyway– its all clear now and settled– and as soon as I can get […], I’ll be over– so keep a weather eye open for me!!!"

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September 26 1946
"When my mother calls me a Scatter Brain– or a nitwit in future– I shall not dispute her any more. "

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October 1 1946
'Oh! Yes– the pix is a small one of the coloured one, that should almost be your way by now– its just a preview– and remember the coloured one “aint” so hot clouse up!

This paper is really lousy– but its all I have around right now– its really my homework paper– so I’m a bit worried."

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October 13 1946
"I’ll have to apply for my medical too– get that over with. Harry– are you really sure that you want me to come over? I mean– if you aren’t quite sure, and you would like to get “dug in” a little more– I’ll wait until maybe the Spring– you only have to say dear!!!"

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October 22 1946
"You big palooka! I’ve just this very minute arrived home to lunch. Your letter was waiting for me on the mat. I’m so terribly sorry darling–but it seems as though I didn’t word my phrase about “digging in” correctly. I’m really sorry– but it wasn’t meant to sound the way it it did."

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November 2 1946
"Thanks Darling– I knew you would! Now about the money– I want to know if you think this is O.K. I’ve made enquiries and found that I can only change ten pounds into dollars, well, to start with, before I did any booking for a passage– I had managed to have sixty pounds– then there was the cancelation – I only got 5 out of my 20 deposit back– well theres now the agents fee fro the work he’s (not!) putting in–plus visa cost– passport cost, ..."

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November 2 1946
December 3 1946
How’s business old sport? Got a new girl yet? (in the shop of course, silly)

I told moms to expect a letter from you within the future, and she was so happy.

Oh yes! About the Xmas present deal; if I can’t send any then you aren’t to either, I’ll make your photo my present too! O.K.?"

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December 15 1946
"Well now Harry you have really sold me without my asking the very thing that has doubted me that you will do your utmost for Betty’s happiness."

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December 20 1946
December 22 1946
"Practically all our relations have invited themselves down for Xmas– with the excuse that its my last at home, I guess we’ll just have to stack’em against the walls– there’s just dozens of blighters too!!! I suppose my uncles will come armed with practically a whole mistletoe root each!!"

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January 21 1947
"Don’t let that 11 o’clock rising get a hold on her as I know only too well every Sunday morning when I at least expected a cup of tea in bed, as the family always gets one every morning at 5:30am but also i still get my own Sunday’s included but I see to it the family does not get one in bed on Sundays. I know Rita always had a job to waken Betty every morning to get her to work so don’t let her slide back into those habits."

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April 16 1953
"Cheryl keeps saying today “C’mon let’s go– get up – bye bye see Dadda”. A little while ago the French Silver Liberte passed us and what a thrill – she was only a couple of hundred feet away– They were recognizing each other by the blasts on the horn. Then just after that the Dutch Silver New Amsterdam passed us on her way to New York."

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April 20 1953
"Don’t ask what a time I’m having with the kids– until they get adjusted– when we got off the boat Thursday at 9pm I was ready to snap– arms were loaded and Cheryl was awful cranky and wouldn’t walk, Ailene was still very weak and tired and was crying to “get on a plane and go home to Daddy”."

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April 27 1953
"Lil Ailene wants to know why everyone stares at us when we are out – she can’t understand why!! Their clothes are real jazzy in comparison to the others. Now, how would you like to have a real English Tailored sport jacket (they call them blazers) its navy […] with these outside stitched pockets and silver sport buttons– either plain back or two slits!!"

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