• Flea Market Love Letters

December 31, 1913.




Dear Harriet:


Here hasn’t a day passed since school closed that I haven’t thought about you and your coming trip. I supposed you are on your way now and I hope that you have rested up so that you can enjoy your trip to the fullest extent. I worry about you, honey, so many times for fear you will go all to pieces sometime but I would give anything to have your enthusiasm and you the ability that goes with it. If I had, perhaps I would amount to something in this world.


We had a very pleasant Christmas. I received some lovely gifts as I always do. Everyone is altogether goo good to me. A very pretty, but some what pathetic greeting from Edie Prairie.


The Ruskins spent Xmas day with us and Clarence came out later which added immensely to the our good time. The weather is still mild as it was when you left.


Today, I was invited to a luncheon at Margaret Doty’s. A number of the old academy girls were there and we had a lovely time. It seems so good to see somebody from Mac. On my way home I saw Billy Walker. Poor fellow, he looked sort of lonesome like. He has been here and in Mpls. all vacation. I also saw Edith Speckwar and Helen Stanley. Of course I was delighted (?) to see them. I hate to ride past Mar on the car when school is closed. It shows that the life of the school is in its pupils.


Can’t tell you what I’ve done lately, because I haven’t done anything but eat and sleep. Mother has kept just as quiet as a mouse and consequently I have slept until nine and ten o’clock and then she won’t let me do anything when I do get up so I am getting spoiled for sure.


Have been lonesome as the dickens. Am just beginning to realize what next year will be away from all you dear people.


But this is a great way to rave on to a girl who wants to be cheered up, isn’t it.


Tell Mr. Guthrie that his understudy has a very bad cold but that she is trying he best to take his place. Tell him that everything went off as well as could be expected last Sunday and so many people asked me how his tonsillitis was.


This isn’t much of a letter but really very little has happened since you left. Remember that I shall think of you and pray that you may derive much good from the convention.


And all your own wishes and all my wishes for you will only tell a tiny part of the joy and prosperity I want the year to hold for you.


Sending thoughts that are just full of love.


I am as ever,

Gertrude


1676 Capitol Ave.

St. Paul Minn.


1 view0 comments

Recent Posts

See All