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  • Flea Market Love Letters

September 27, 1921.




Dear Alice,

Half-past three, and Arthur and I have just come home from school! This is literally true. At least, we have just come from the school-house. When he came home a short time before he was minus a hat, having thrown it on top of a closet where he was unable to reach it. Therefore we went up, climbing the four flight of stairs, borrowed the janitor’s brush, and so rescued the little brown hat which you adore. After the had reposed safely on his head again, Arthur said, “It wasn’t any trouble at all to get it; was it?” I said “What do you call coming all this distance to get it?” “Yes,” he said, “that’s so.” I was really glad to do it for the little fellow. It was exactly the thing that might happen to a playful boy. He had thrown it up and down, and finally it handed, as said before, where it was outside his reach. He just now called in from his desk the reason why he did not mention the matter to Mrs. Jessup. He thought she might not like it that he had been playing with the hat. It happened at one o’clock.

After you left this morning, Arthur and I bought an apple-pie at Cushman’s and a half pound of ground meat at Grim’s for dinner. Then we came home, where I washed the dishes, -- so romantic -- and when the clock struck half-past eight we again meanderd up to ninety-third street where I assisted Arthur acros Broadway. Coming back to the house I worked at my desk gathering material for Sunday’s sermon until eleven o’clock. Then I peeled the potatoes and gave myself over an to an hour’s delight in getting a meal. It worked out all right. By the time Arthur came home the seaming viands were on the table. This is what we had for dinner: Bread, butter, apple-pie, and a piece of cake for Arthur which he did not eat. Our extremely thoughtful little housekeeper before leaving, gave us a box of delicious chocolate mints, and upon this occasion we each ate two wafers. And we did enjoy them immensely, and once more express our gratitude to you for thinking of the chocolates.

We are now at our respective desks writing to the dearest little woman in the world. Of course, we miss you. How could it be otherwise? But we are glad that you have a chance to be do away on so delightful a jaunt, and wish you a most delightful time from beginning to end. I forgot to mention that at the proper time time after dinner Arthur was whisked off to school, I accompanying him across Broadway, where he went one way, and I out Broadway to the bank where I deposited your mortgage or whatever it was. Therefore you need not worry over that. As soon as we are thru with our letters we will go over to the Park. I thought this was a good time to write, because in this way I do not have to go out and mail the letters while Arthur is alone in the house. Besides, we want you to hear from us by to-morrow noon at latest. We will have supper at the house to-day, and no doubt we will keep it up unless we should get too tired of our own cooking.

Wishing you the very best of time, I am with a wealth of love, as ever

Harry

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